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[Reflection] Eman Eid on the blessings taken for granted and the treasure of contentment

Sufi Comics - The Headache
Sufi Comics – The Headache

Have you ever found yourself taking for granted the simple blessings in life? Sufficient food, clean water, education, or even a roof over our heads. The month of Ramadan was a month to rethink, revalue and reflect on one’s blessings. As we bid farewell to the month of Ramadan for another year, Eman Eid reflects on these blessings in life and what we can learn from the challenges we face.

This Sufi Comic: The Headache, made me realize how great our life really is. It describes how a man has a bad headache and how he questions why God has done this to him. But what he doesn’t take into consideration is how God has kept him well for 30 years, still he hasn’t thanked Him for doing so. Instead the man complains rather than thanking God for all He does for him.

In today’s society we are often blinded by other peoples luxuries that we cannot see and be thankful for what we have. We complain over small things when others would kill to live the way we do. We complain because we don’t have the best clothes, yummiest food, or even that we might have the most homework. What we don’t realize is that some people are less fortunate than we are and might not even have clothes on their back, or food to eat, or even a book to read. We are showered with treasures and only crave more.

How foolish we are that we complain and never even stop to think that we have it all and should be thankful for all we have. God has given us so much and if only we can realize that He does what He does for the benefit of us. We might go through situations that seem unfair and we ask God why has He done this to us but it is actually to cure us. Read more

[Interview] Absar Kazmi on illustrating humorous comics with a thoughtful message and his take on social media

Artist Absar Kasmi
Talented artist Absar Kazmi

Equipped with a life-long passion for drawing, and an advocate for faith, moral and ethical issues, Absar Kazmi is founder and illustrator of a clever comic series: Life with the Ahmad Family. In the series he explores a variety of issues evident in Muslim societies, as well as stories and messages that appeal to people of all faiths, ages and backgrounds.

All this wrapped in an often times humorous package, Absar says he wanted to create something different with the Ahmad family: “I wanted to show that practicing Muslim families live real lives; no doubt prayer, fasting, reading Qur’an are all extremely important, but Muslims families also joke with one another, we play football, we go on picnics and we like reading regular books too!”

Absar was born in Pakistan, but spent lot of his youth traveling (and sketching) from country to country, from the animals in the wilderness safaris of Kenya to drawings of superheroes. However he soon gave this up, only to renew this passion in later years of university and married life. He then found a way he could sketch that was Islamically permissible and wanted to pursue both his passion for drawing and passion for his faith, “With the popularity of conventional comics and cartoons amongst the Muslim youth – it seemed that there was a real need for Islamically acceptable comics and other media for the youth” he says.

After a few creative pursuits, in late 2011 Absar was given a platform from Hiba Magazine to develop a cartoon for them to attract a wider audience, and thus Life with the Ahmad Family was born. Read my exclusive interview with Absar as he shares his interesting journey, his take on issues surrounding social media and technology, and even tips for the upcoming month of Ramadan.

How did ‘Life with the Ahmad Family’ come about? What led you to create this series, and why?

That’s an interesting story… About seven to eight years years ago while lying in bed trying to go to sleep I had an idea for a story about a boy who has a really bad day. Since I couldn’t go to sleep anyway, I began to type it out. His day starts out bad, gets worse; soon becomes awful, then horrible, and finally downright abominable! I called the story ‘A Bad Time Tale’ and I named the boy Jamal.

A short while later I heard about an international story writing competition to be held by a well-known Islamic books publishing company. I thought this is the perfect opportunity to see how my story does, so I fixed it up a bit and sent it in to the competition. Alhumdulillah, it won first place!

“I wanted to show that Muslim families also joke with one another, we play football, we go on picnics and we like reading regular books too!”

Now I really wanted to have my ‘book’ published; however, I thought to myself, ‘Why in the world would anyone want to read a children’s book by a completely unknown author?!’  So, I just sat on the idea for a few years… not really knowing how to take it further.

A few years later, in late 2011, Hiba Magazine approached me asking me to develop a character or cartoon for them in order to help them attract a younger audience. I agreed to help them, but didn’t really know where to begin. Then it dawned on me… This could be THE opportunity to introduce Jamal to the world. So I developed a comic about Jamal and his family and called it ‘Life with the Ahmad Family’. I was hoping that this comic would allow me to get people accustomed to the Ahmad Family and then soon I could also introduce ‘A Bad-Time Tale’ to this new audience.

Image from Jamal's Bad-Time Tale
Image from Jamal’s Bad-Time Tale

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